Library

Showing posts with label teaching. Show all posts
Showing posts with label teaching. Show all posts

20 March 2017

Citing and referencing - a guide for teaching staff

Citing and referencing is an essential academic skill that students enrolled in your teaching unit may struggle with, says Librarian Louise Micallef. She outlines some ways the Library can help your students.

Despite the fact that they have undertaken research for school assignments, work or personal purposes, for most students, the university is often the first encounter they have with academic literature. The need to reference their work accurately according to a prescribed style can cause some anxiety, particularly as it affects overall marks.

At the Library, we are experts at citing and referencing and can help your students to understand and apply this crucial skill, which is required in assignments at university level to:
  • demonstrate the credibility of their ideas 
  • validate their work 
  • give due credit to the research of others, and
  • allow readers to locate the original sources used for ideas and evidence in an assignment.
In my experience as a subject librarian, some of the most common citing and referencing mistakes made by students are:
  • incorrect use of commas, italics and ampersands
  • spelling inconsistencies
  • overuse of direct quotes
  • incorrect use of ‘et al.’
  • wrong order of multiple citations in a single parenthesis
  • failure to include a DOI for journal articles if appropriate for the style
  • failure to list all cited sources in the reference list and to do so in accurate alphabetical order
  • general formatting errors such as spacing and use of hanging indents
  • inability to correctly identify the resource type they are dealing with.
Evidently, the protocols and intricacies of referencing are often overwhelming and quite daunting for some students. So where can  you direct your students so they can learn the principles of citing and referencing  and how to effectively and accurately apply it to their work? The Library has created a number of excellent resources and opportunities for students to develop these crucial academic skills.

Five ways the Library can help your students with citing and referencing

1. Library Guides – Citing and Referencing and EndNote

We create Library guides to pull together useful resources on a variety of research skills topics or subject areas all in the one place. The Citing and Referencing Library Guide  covers the full range of citing and referencing styles used at Monash. Students can learn about why, how and when to cite and reference for their next assignment or research paper there.

Similarly, EndNote is a very useful reference management software that stores and automatically creates citations, references and bibliographies for assignments in the required style. Of course, EndNote is not foolproof, so we recommend that students understand how citations and references are used in academic writing when using the program to ensure accuracy. For a comprehensive guide to using Endnote, including "how to use it"  tutorials, see our EndNote Library Guide

2. Demystifying Citing and Referencing - tutorial

The Library has also created an online, interactive citing and referencing tutorial which includes activities and short self-assessment quizzes. It has been designed to teach the principles of citing and referencing, and understand how to avoid plagiarising when integrating source material. This valuable tutorial takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.

3. Research and Learning Point – drop-in sessions

Students can drop in for a 15 minute consultation with a Subject Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser at the Library. At a drop-in session students can get advice on research for their assignments, academic communication and study skills including citing and referencing.

There is no need for them to make an appointment and students are seen on a first come, first served basis. This service is offered between week two to twelve at all Monash libraries. See session times here.

4. Library program, resource or activity embedded in curriculum

We can work with you to design and teach a particular segment, class or resource as part of the academic curriculum for your unit, to ensure that students know the principles of citing and referencing and how to apply them for your assignments and projects.

Contact our specialist staff  to discuss further

5. One on one consultations (postgraduate students)

Librarians and learning skills advisers have specialist knowledge of resources and publishing in various subject disciplines. Postgraduate students are entitled to make individual appointments with their subject librarian and learning skills adviser at any stage of their research. We can provide you with specialist advice about citing and referencing for thesis or journal article submission.

Contact our specialist staff  to make an appointment.

So, if citing and referencing evokes a sense of dread in your students, help is always available from the Library both in person and online!





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17 March 2017

High tech and emerging company and industry information

The Library has recently subscribed to two specialist databases which expand your options when researching rapidly evolving companies and industries, says David Horne, Business and Economics Librarian. 


Need in-depth intelligence on global pharmaceuticals, or other high tech markets?

BCC Research provides detailed market research reports covering the range of high technology sectors, including but not limited to, biotechnology, advanced materials, energy, food and beverage, health care and pharmaceuticals.

Need to have up-to-date news and data on Uber and similar emerging companies?

CB Insights
closely tracks emerging and evolving tech companies, including their performance, financing, industry trends and competitors. Once you have registered and accessed CB Insights, click the toolbar Help and view: “What can I do with CB Insights?” for a useful introduction.

The specialist focus and content of these new subscriptions complements the Library's existing key company and industry information sources including: DatAnalysis Premium, IBIS World, MINT Global, Passport and MarketLine Advantage.

Access them via the Company and Industry library guide: or via the Databases A-Z menu from the Library home page.

Can’t find the data you need? Consult your library’s Research & Learning Point or local Faculty Team librarian





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15 March 2017

Digital exhibition simulates medieval Angkor Wat

A dynamic simulation that shows how the metropolis of Angkor Wat in Cambodia might have operated in the 12th century is to be displayed at the Hargrave-Andrew Library from 16 March.


The project from the Faculty of Information Technology’s (FIT) sensiLab draws upon a wide range of archaeological and historical data and uses an immersive, 3D visualisation to test how historical assumptions about Angkor can be made more precise.

The FIT team coordinated by Tom Chandler includes 3D animators Brent McKee and Chandara Ung, games designers and programmers Mike Yeates, Elliott Wilson and Kingsley Stephens and archaeological advisors Martin Polkinghorne and Roland Fletcher.

Constructed by King Suryavarman II (1113 – 1150), the temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia is a world famous heritage site and the largest religious monument on earth. In 2013, LiDAR archaeological surveys confirmed a grid pattern of roads and household ponds, suggesting a regular layout of dispersed and substantial wooden dwellings.

In the simulation, the paths of thousands of animated ‘agents’ are tracked as they enter, exit and circulate within the temple enclosure over 24 hours. The detailed virtual world depicted in the simulation follows the pace of daily life in a tropical, preindustrial urban centre from dawn through to nightfall.

Hear about the technology behind the exhibition from Tom Chandler, at a “Meet the researcher” event. Light refreshments will be served. No RSVP required.

Date: Thursday 16 March at 1pm

Venue: Hargrave-Andrew Library, 13 College Walk, Clayton Campus

“Simulating 24 Hours at medieval Angkor Wat” will be on show until the end of semester two, 2017.













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24 January 2017

Incorporating collaborative learning techniques into classes

Learning Skills Adviser Roslyn Halliday lets us in on some of her teaching techniques.



Photo courtesy Monash Image Library
Within the Research and Learning team at Monash Library, we’ve been employing a variety of teaching strategies to create classes that are inspiring, engaging and encourage deep learning. One key focus has been the use of ‘active learning’, that is, the incorporation of interactive, collaborative and student-centred learning activities.

Below I outline some tried and tested strategies that I have drawn upon in my classes to help promote interactive and collaborative learning within the classroom - techniques which can be applied to a variety of educational settings.

1. Online polling sites

Polling sites generally involve students engaging with lecture or tutorial content by posting questions via SMS. Responses are automatically collated and visible to everyone in the room, either on a data projector or by logging onto the site on individual devices.

Some sites enable students to vote for questions they feel are most pertinent to the class (thereby helping to create a student-centred session when the most popular questions are addressed during the session).

Try: 


2. Think-pair-share

Students are presented with a problem, question or issue and are asked to firstly think about their response on their own (and perhaps write it down or draw it). Providing thinking time for students has shown to increase the quality of their responses. Students then share their responses in pairs. This encourages quieter students to participate and provides another opportunity to refine or add depth to ideas. Each pair then shares with the whole group, which subsequently forms the basis of a whole group discussion.

3. Think-pair-square-share

As above, but before sharing with the whole group, each pair of students shares with another pair (ie. a square). Provides further opportunity to refine ideas.

4. Think-pair-tweet-share

Like above, but students generate a Tweet (or 140 characters), to articulate their idea. Or you might ask students to communicate an idea via Snapchat instead – a more widely used app than Twitter amongst younger folk. 

5. Jigsaw

A technique developed by Elliot Aronson in the 1970s, students work in small groups (ideally between 4 and 6 students). The topic/problem/task under consideration is broken down into small segments, and each group is allocated one segment to focus on. They then become ‘experts’ in that particular area. The groups are then rearranged so that each person reports to a new group as an ‘expert’ on their area of focus. This strategy encourages every student to be actively involved in the learning process.


Conclusion

Each of these strategies can be adapted to suit different educational contexts, and they help get students thinking, discussing, and working in groups. This in turn fosters a more interactive learning environment and promotes deeper engagement.






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23 January 2017

Statista – a new source of data

Subject Librarian David Horne tells us in this article about an online statistics portal that can provide very useful information for many areas of research.  



Statista is a portal for data relevant to business, economics, media and social topics, with international coverage. Its content, ease of use and range of output options make it a key Library resource to consult when seeking data for written assignments, presentations and lectures.

The data encompasses statistics, forecasts, industry reports, dossiers (topic overviews), studies, and infographics. Statista’s intuitive search interface provides easy sorting and filtering of results, and links to the information providers for a given search result.  An example of the kind of clear information Statista provides is given in the graph below showing the change in the number worldwide Internet users between 2006 and 2016.

Data can be customised using Statista’s style options, and exported in PNG, XLS, PDF or PPT formats. This allows easy inclusion of images and data from Statista in presentations and documents.

Access Statista from its record in Search, or from the Databases A-Z menu. http://guides.lib.monash.edu/subject-databases


Can’t find the data you need? Consult your library’s Research & Learning Point or local Faculty Team librarian. http://www.monash.edu/library/skills/contacts


An example of a Statista graph, available to Monash staff and students.






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3 November 2016

The Lyell Collection – a wealth of valuable Earth Science resources

Jennifer Kain, Subject Librarian, lets  us know about a specialist geology resource, that includes information from the early nineteenth century.

Named after Charles Lyell, the eminent nineteenth-century geologist, the Lyell Collection is a highly regarded and comprehensive online collection from the Geological Society (London).  It includes journal titles, Special Publications & Memoirs, along with key Book series and material published on behalf of other related societies.

Cutting edge science sits alongside important historical material, all captured and presented via the HighWire Press platform, and available to us as HTML or high quality PDF.

Content, from 1811 onwards, covers a wide range of topics in the Earth Sciences, including; Geology, Hydrogeology, Geochemistry, Palaeontology, Geo-engineering, Petroleum, Mining, Environment, Climate, Volcanology, Planetary sciences and many other related areas of interest to Monash reserchers.  You might be surprised to find what gems could be discovered!  Try a search on your own topic.

For each item found you may also discover fully linked references embedded, enabling users to navigate from the original journal article to other cited references.  These may also be available in full-text if these cited references are part of our wider HighWire Press collections, or be available as part of another Monash subscription.

Lyell Collection is an excellent resource for the Earth Sciences in particular, but includes some valuable material for the wider Science/Engineering areas as well.  Enjoy exploring the Lyell Collection from the Monash University Library.

Contact the Subject Librarian with any enquiries.  jennifer.kain@monash.edu

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20 October 2016

Integrating Library guides into Moodle

Library guides showcase Library resources and collections by subject areas and/or provide a detailed guide to Library applications. 


Some lecturers have provided a link to a particular Library guide in their unit’s student reading list. Now, linking to a Library guide from your Moodle unit page is an equally useful way to encourage students to research a range of subject literature or use particular resources. By Tracey Whyte

Why should I integrate Library guides into my Moodle site?


Monash University Library staff have created over 100 Library guides, displaying a variety of topics as can be seen on Library guides website. Each individual guide is separate, allowing for easy linking or embedding of this content.

Like Moodle, Library guides permit:

  • easy navigation - information and applications or databases can be located and retrieved quickly 
  • easy collation of statistics to report usage or evaluate effectiveness
  • collaboration between Library and academic staff
  • content can be printed by students or staff
  • accessibility documents can be created.

There are three different types of Library guides:

1. Faculty and Subject Library guides.  Librarians and Learning skills advisers have created these over 100 of these popular guides across all faculties and linking to content in almost all subject areas taught at the University . Subjects covered in an individual guide cover such widely diverse topics as Indigenous health, Systematic reviews, Econometrics and Business statistics, Marketing, Industrial Design, Medieval and renaissance history, and Physics and Astronomy. The guides link to Library information research and learning skills content in a variety of multimedia formats. There may also be links to unit specific information or resources for particular cohort.

2. Collection and resources Library guides provide discovery and access to information and collections. Examples include the Library guides for Databases, Government Publications, Ada Booth Slavic collection  and the Map collection.

3. There are also instructional Library guides including for Citing and referencing, Endnote, Moodle and Turnitin.

How can a Library guide be incorporated into my unit?


While Library guides may be created to build students skills or knowledge of a discipline and some are aimed at researchers, academics can take advantage of these specialist resources for improved learning and teaching. Talk to your Subject Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser about incorporating Library guides in your units.

All guides are presented in a consistent, structured manner; content displayed can be presented in a variety of formats including text, links, tables, images, widgets, and from RSS or social media feeds. Other resources such as videos or learning objects, like the Academic Integrity module, can be embedded or linked in the platform.

Stay tuned for the next Teaching blog, ‘Discovering Library guides - supplement the resources in your unit Moodle sites’, which will continue this theme, provide practical tips and add more insights into the use of Library guides.

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5 October 2016

A welcome resource: New LGBTQ database


The Archives of sexuality and gender : LGBTQ history and culture since 1940 gives access to a range of resources surrounding the social, political and health issues relating to the LGBTQ movement since the 1940, by Rod Rizzi


The Library has acquired a subscription to a new database that contains a wealth of information and resources across the social science, humanities and health subject areas.

The Archives of sexuality and gender: Part 1, LGBTQ history and culture since 1940 database provides access to articles on a broad range of political, social and health issues that have previously not been available as part of the mainstream media. It allows us to look back at stories as they broke from a perspective that has not always been available via our traditional and indeed existing databases.

Using the unique ‘Term Clusters’ visual wheel to look at related subject areas can uncover relevant information that a simple search may have overlooked.

The database content is drawn from more than 35 countries sourcing relevant material in the form of reports, policy statements, articles and the like. The coverage of the AIDS crisis is a particular feature, but equally the inclusion of material in relation to feminism and women’s rights are notable features.

Archives of Human Sexuality and Identity can be found by going to Library Search and the Databases A-Z page.


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29 September 2016

Making the ordinary extraordinary


By Daniel Wee

Old and special books are an important element of any rare books collection, and people are often surprised by some of the items we acquire for Monash University Library. Our recent acquisition of over 400 school readers from the Whitcombe and Tombs series certainly fits into this category. Individually the readers are well used, somewhat unimpressive in appearance, and incongruous amongst the typical rare decorative cloth, fine gilt bindings and delicate engravings. However, when these singularities are merged to form a collection, the seemingly subdued suddenly takes on a new lustre.




Taking advantage of the Antipodeans’ late 19th-century interest in children's literature, New Zealand bookseller, George Hawkes Whitcombe, and printer, George Tombs, created “low-priced, paper-wrapped children’s supplementary readers” en masse (McLaren, 1984). The series became known in Australasia as ‘Whitcombe’s Story Books’. The printing of 12 million copies of original Australasian and classic literature from 1908 to 1962 is a testament to the proliferation of leisure reading amongst the masses over this time and the unyielding demand for cheap books.

These little readers demonstrated a delineation from prescribed canonised texts and inflexible school syllabuses to the 'democratisation' of education and availability of books to the masses. By creating cheap and accessible alternatives and supplements to school curriculums, Whitcombe and Tombs contributed to the cultural phenomenon of child readership. Jeff Prentice, muses in 'A History of the Book in Australia' that the 1930s and 1940s saw a movement that “reflected the needs of real child readers, and an increased willingness to address a child reader directly” (Prentice, 2001).

Unlike the rigidity of the 'School Papers' (a compulsory Education Department (Victoria) publication built into the curriculum), ‘Whitcombe’s Story Books’ amalgamated supplementary leisure reading with prescriptive texts. Whitcombe and Tombs’ encroachment into the school curriculum was met with a failed Victorian Royal Commission in 1935-36 after it was suggested that the bookseller was 'hijacking' the syllabus (Prentice, 2001).

The new acquisition of ‘Whitcombe’s Story Books’ are housed in the Lindsay Shaw Collection in the Rare Books Collection of the Library. This collection of over 12,000 items from the 19th and 20th century form one of Australia’s premier children’s literature collections.

Lindsay Shaw was the Secretary of the Monash Faculty of Education when he began to donate books to the Library in 1979. Lindsay was a major collector of Australian children's books and began his gift to Monash by donating sets of Ethel Turner and Mary Grant Bruce. As part of the development of this impressive collection, the Rare Books team posthumously supplement his collection by purchasing rare and important English, American and Australian children’s books.

The collection is available for viewing and research purposes Monday to Friday from 9.00am to 5.00pm.  Items can be found through Search and our knowledgeable librarians can work with you to discover some of the treasures that are housed in your Rare Books collection.



References

McLaren, I., and Whitcombe Tombs Limited 1984, Whitcombe's Story Books : A Trans-Tasman Survey. U of Melbourne Library, Parkville.

Prentice, J 2001, ‘Case-study: Textbook publishing’, in J Arnold, A history of the Book in Australia 1891-1945 : A National Culture in a Colonised Market. U of Queensland, St Lucia, Qld , pp. 294-297.


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1 September 2016

Migration to new worlds

Migration to New Worlds is a digital primary source collection that explores the journeys of 19th and early 20th century immigrants from around the world to the United States, Canada and Australasia. ... by Melanie Thorn



'Canada Docks', 1860, watercolour. 
Most of the material is from the period 1800 to 1924, the ‘Century of immigration’, and comes from institutions in the U.S., U.K. and Canada, with a small number of items from Museum Victoria and the Maritime Museum of Tasmania included. The material incorporates Colonial Office files, manuscripts, watercolours, rare printed books, ship logs and plans, legal papers, maps and scrapbooks, and objects related to migration. There is also a significant collection of first hand accounts in the form of letters, diaries and oral histories. The database includes an interactive Migration Map which allows you to analyse and visualise migration trends using data from around the world, and also provides some secondary research aids such as the biographies of major immigrant agents and Tasmanian migrant stories. Content can be discovered by browsing thematic areas such as ‘Motives for Emigration’, ‘Departures: Port Conditions and Organisation’ and ‘Journey Conditions’, or browsing or searching the Documents, Galleries, and Oral History sections. Migration to New Worlds is available through Library Search and the Databases A-Z. For other primary source databases, the Primary Sources for Humanities Library Guide is a great place to start!



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12 August 2016

Engage your students with high quality images



We live in an increasingly visual culture, where a powerful image can be an effective way to create engagement with teaching presentations and elearning content. A quick trawl of the web would suggest that loads of visual materials are available freely at your fingertips, but these may not necessarily be academically sound or of high quality. Carlie Nekrasov breaks down how to find images through the Library's database.




Some of the questions to ask before using a random image in an academic context include;
  1. What are the copyright requirements? i.e. what are the terms/conditions associated with using particular images?
  2. How do I cite and reference them?

There is a better way

Forget about attempting to navigate these questions via a Google Images search. The library provides access to hundreds of thousands of high resolution images within databases that have been copyright cleared for educational use (which means they can be used for teaching purposes or within moodle sites, just not in a wider context such as in publications and/or open access materials). We have also created a dedicated Digital Images Library Guide.


Once you bookmark these resources it becomes easier to source images for teaching purposes as you are not required to hunt down permissions and agreeable terms/conditions.




The Digital Images library guide is a whole guide dedicated to the use of images within the academic environment, so dive in and take a look here. It is a treasure trove for researchers and teachers, including information on image search engines, databases, open access images, citing images, tools for editing and how to comply with copyright.

Explore the library’s most extensive image databases:
ARTstor is a stellar image database containing an extensive collection of millions of images from 290 collections around the world. So if you are putting together a presentation on ancient cultures, ARTstor has you covered with a high resolution image of an ancient Egyptian mural painting circa 1400 B.C.


Other gems available via this database include; Kandinsky paintings, photographs of Andy Warhol’s brillo boxes and classical medieval manuscripts to name just a few. Along with arts subjects there is also access to images related to science and technology, geography, and many more subject areas. The keyword searching feature helps you to refine your results, and the easily exportable citations in various styles and functions enable you to use it with PowerPoint and embed image details with captions directly into your presentations.


Click here to explore the database.


Bridgeman Education provides access to over 1.2 million digital images ready for you to use and copyright cleared for educational use. Some of the subject areas include art, history and culture from global museums, galleries, private collections and contemporary artists.


Click here to explore the database.



Further help?

Contact the MADA Subject Librarian or the Copyright Advisor for further advice on where to find images and how to use them when creating academic materials.


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29 July 2016

Find your chemical information in ACS Publications

ACS Publications, including Sci Finder,  are the go-to resources for any research involving  chemistry, writes Nhan Le, a subject librarian from the Library's Science faculty team.

It has been said that chemistry, within our own times, has become a central science, from which all things emanate, and to which all things return*. The American Chemical Society (ACS) concurs with this mantra.

Monash University Library subscribes to all ACS Publications.  The database consists of:
  • Journals  -  nearly 50 peer-reviewed journals contain cutting-edge articles across a broad spectrum of scientific disciplines. The ACS began the publication of chemical research with the Journal of the American Chemical Society in 1879.
  • Chemical & Engineering News  - the weekly trade magazine
  • eBooks - the peer-reviewed ebooks contain essential research conducted by the world's leading scientists across all disciplines and applications. They now include more than 1,400 titles developed from ACS-sponsored symposia. Approximately 30 new ebooks are published each year.
Selected features
  •  Browse the Journal  - this option allows researchers to browse the journal via either “List of Issues”, or precisely select a specific issue of interest via the option “Select Decade”, “Select Volume”, then “Select Issue”
  •  Article ASAP (As Soon As Publishable),  that are edited and published online ahead of issue
  • Graphical abstracts, which are displayed on the journal table of contents
  • SciFinder database,  that can be accessed directly on the article level.
Also, when searching in SciFinder, if a graphical abstract is displayed on the search results page, researchers can be sure that the reference is one of the ACS journal articles. Therefore researchers can access it electronically.

You can access all the scholarly material on ACS Publications through the Library-managed subscription - via Search or the Databases - chemistry page.

ACS Publications and Figshare

As ACS Publications partners with Digital Science’s Figshare** to promote open data discovery and use, the scientific community can expect to retrieve chemistry-related datasets on the Figshare research data management tool.


*The Literary and Scientific Repository, and Critical Review, vol. 2, p. 221,
**ACS news release, 2015 

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5 July 2016

Working towards an inclusive learning environment

Small steps can be taken towards creating a more inclusive style of teaching, suggests Diana Thompson.


With the Monash student cohort growing in size and diversity are we doing all that we can to grow with our students?

The University's new strategic plan identifies “inclusive” as a key goal.  Being inclusive is a proactive approach involving planning with a wide range of learning styles, abilities and backgrounds in mind and being responsive rather than reactive, that is, only modifying your classes out of necessity. Inclusive teaching is not intended to dilute the standards of a course.  But a “one size fits all” approach actually does not fit most.  Just because a student may have different needs or learn in a different way does not make them any less academically capable than another student.

The first steps towards an inclusive approach do not need to create an abundance of additional work. Being conscious of practices during the planning phase, determining what you include and the design of your lecture slides can begin to foster an inclusive environment and an easy first step.  If this has already been a focus of your planning in the past, then perhaps the next stage could be looking at assessments and marking rubrics to determine if all students have opportunities to demonstrate their knowledge.  Or maybe activities that take into account the rich experiences that student already have and using this as a learning opportunity.

Some guidelines that outline good practices, developed by Monash, are on the Better Teaching Better Learning page for both inclusive teaching for disabilities and inclusive education guidelines for diverse genders and sexualities.  These can help to challenge the thought process of your planning and are a great start for building an inclusive environment.  What they both have in common is that they identify that an inclusive approach will benefit all students in your class regardless of background or educational experience. It also acknowledges that inclusive teaching is more than just making lecture notes accessible for download.  It can be through multiple means of representation and delivery and by focusing on the context of the material rather than just the content.

Small steps in this area are better than no change at all. Remember the Library has Learning Skills Advisers and Subject Librarians who can work with you towards creating an inclusive environment. Alternatively you can contact the Office of the Vice Provost (Learning and Teaching) or Disability Support Services about how to implement their guidelines in more detail or look at the CEED modules that are being run.




Diana Thompson is a subject librarian based in the Berwick Library. She works with other Library staff academics and other teams in the University for social inclusion-related programs being implemented across the campuses. Contact Diana to find out more.




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15 June 2016

Changes to the Matheson Library

Works on the Sir Louis Matheson Library have passed the halfway mark, and we’re well on track for completion by the end of the year. In order to undertake the final stage of this transformation process, a number of temporary changes are required to library operations and access. 



Temporary closure during the mid-year break

The Matheson Library will close to all staff, students and visitors on Saturday 25 June and will reopen on Monday 18 July ready for the start of Orientation Week. Check the blog for a list of alternative study and work areas and arrangements for pick-up and return of items for this period.

During these three weeks, we’ll complete the heavy demolition works to pave the way for the new and visually striking library entrance. This will involve the demolition and replacement of some external wall portions with transparent facades to improve the visual connection into and out of the library.

While these works are being carried out, we will closely monitor and manage noise and dust levels to ensure minimal disturbance to neighbouring building occupants.

Relocation of library entrance

From 18 July, the library entrance will be temporarily closed and a new entry will be created on the eastern side in the Performing Arts courtyard. This entrance will remain in place until the beginning of Semester 1 2017. During this time, we’ll construct the spectacular new library entrance as well as complete landscaping works in the Forum.

Initial hoarding has been installed, and will be extended out progressively in line with works staging. With this hoarding in place, there will be no access to the after-hours book return chute. Borrowers can return books after hours using the return chutes at the Hargrave-Andrew and Law libraries during this time.





Landscaping works on the Forum

In September, we’ll commence landscaping works on the Forum, the lawn area between the Matheson Library, Chancellors Walk and Exhibition Walk. These works will rejuvenate the area, complement the new Matheson Library entrance, and create a contemporary, central and ceremonial space.

A new forecourt will be established to the Matheson Library adjacent to the Menzies Building, providing areas to meet, gather and study within a reinvigorated landscape. We’ll also improve pedestrian access with larger walkways and new lighting.

Hoarding around the Matheson Library will change as various stages of the Forum landscaping are completed. Directional signage will be in place to guide pedestrian access until the completion of works in February 2017.

More information




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5 April 2016

Keep track of parliaments, policy and legislation

LexisNexis Capital Monitor provides expert monitoring of Australian parliaments, policy and legislation and is at your fingertips, says Caroline Knaggs, a subject librarian at the Law Library.




Parliament House, Canberra
Capital Monitor is a long established, extensive database which collects parliamentary, policy, legislative, regulatory and judicial news and information from both Federal and State Governments. 

It includes:

● Press releases, transcripts and additional related statements by government, opposition, and other parties, as well as industry reaction;

● Parliamentary papers, committee and inquiry reports, digests, and other official documents;

● Legislation and associated information such as second reading speeches, explanatory memoranda and/or statements, schedule of amendments, etc;

● Hansard;

● Cases from a range of courts including the High Court, Federal Court and the Victorian Supreme Court;

● ... and much more!!!

Capital Monitor is a great way to obtain a broad overview of an issue which conveniently brings information together. It enables you to research the background and context of a topic and track its development through to implementation and legislation.

Materials are added in full text almost as soon as they are made available. Coverage starts from 1996 for many of the materials.

Keyword searching is the most effective way to access this extensive collection. You can search across everything or limit your research to specific collections and jurisdictions. You will be presented with a selection of results, with your keywords highlighted. Browsing is also possible over a specific selection of resources

Access LexisNexis Capital Monitor through the A-Z Databases page or Search.

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8 March 2016

MarketLine a major source of company data


MarketLine Advantage is useful to anyone studying business, international finance or globalisation, says David Horne, a subject librarian in the Business faculty team.


MarketLine is a leading producer of worldwide company, industry/market, and country information.
The MarketLine Advantage database provides extensive coverage via an intuitive interface which allows for both effective browsing and rapid pinpointing of required content. Its key components are:


·         More than 5,700 industry profiles, which include Porter’s Five Forces analysis;

·         Over 32,000 company profiles providing SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analyses, with separate sections of MarketLine Advantage focusing on company news, case studies and financial deals;

·         Country reports analysing the political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental (PESTLE) situation in 50 major countries;

·         A Databases option, where various types of customised data, such as country statistics and fast moving consumer goods market analytics, can be generated from the data sets in MarketLine Advantage.

While some MarketLine reports are accessible via other interfaces (e.g. Business Source Complete) these represent only a small fraction of the content of MarketLine Advantage. You may also have known these reports by their former brand, Datamonitor.

MarketLine Advantage will be of interest not just to Business School staff and students but potentially to anyone studying aspects of globalisation, and the global marketplace.

Access MarketLine Advantage from:



If you have questions or comments about using MarketLine Advantage, contact a librarian in the Library Business and Economics Team

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17 February 2016

Teaching first year students: some strategies for week one

The first week of classes can be nerve-wracking for both students and teaching staff. If you are teaching first year students there are things you can do to help them make a successful transition, writes Rachel Chamberlain.



The idea of walking into a room full of  strangers is always daunting, so attending that first tutorial or lecture is likely to provoke a level of anxiety in most people.

For our first year students these feelings are intensified by the multitude of ‘firsts’ they will be experiencing in week one. It may be the first time they have met an academic, participated in a tutorial or lecture or had to find a particular classroom or building. Whilst there will certainly be a lot of excitement about all of these new experiences, students are also likely to feel uncertain about how things work, and how they, and others, are a supposed to act in this new environment.

There are some small things we can do in week one to welcome first year students and to help them make a successful transition to university:
  • An open door: Most students will get lost on campus at some stage and this will probably result in them being late to class. Having to enter a class late, particularly on day one can be terrifying for new students and a closed door is a lot more intimidating than an open one. Leaving the classroom door open for the first 10-15 minutes can make entering the classroom a little less intimidating for any student that does get lost. This also enables you to see students who might be tentatively approaching, or even nervously circling the door, allowing you to identify yourself and invite them in.
  • Making connections: It is a good idea to set aside the first part of class for students (and yourself) to get to know each other. A good ice breaker activity will allow students to start developing social connections with their peers. Remember that you can also participate in these icebreaker activities. In fact, your participation can be really important as it shows your students that you have a genuine interest in them as individuals. Depending on the activity it also provides an opportunity for some one on one conversations that can provide you with some really useful information about the students' backgrounds, interests and motivations for enrolling in your unit.
  • Explain the basics: Our first year students are an extremely diverse group. Your class is likely to include international students, those who are first in family, students from high and low socio-economic backgrounds, school leavers or mature age students. This diversity means that the students will have had vastly different educational experiences, and arrive at Monash with differing levels of knowledge about how university, including your unit or class ‘works’. Can students interrupt you during a tutorial to ask questions? Can they leave the room without asking permission? What should they call you? What is the relationship between tutorials, lectures and readings? In what order should students do these? The answers to these questions may seem self evident to us, but to many first year students this is not the case. Taking time to explain the knowledge we take for granted will improve students' confidence and can clear up misunderstandings before they occur.  
  • Speak English (not Monash): If you have been at Monash for a while, it is likely that you casually use acronyms and language that is distinctly “Monash” (Moodle, Authcate, SETU, WES, MULO). Additionally, you are probably fluent in the language of your faculty, or discipline area. Our first year students are unlikely to speak these languages and so avoiding these and/or explaining them is crucial in the first few weeks of the semester.
A student's first few weeks at Monash will have a significant impact on their overall transition to university, and a successful transition in first year will provide a strong foundation for success in later years.


Rachel Chamberlain is a learning skills adviser based in the Berwick Library. Rachel and subject librarian Diana Thompson work with other Library staff, academics and other teams in the University for social inclusion-related programs being implemented across the campuses. Contact Rachel to find out more.

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7 December 2015

Multimedia resources to enrich your teaching

Have you wanted to engage students with relevant and interesting multimedia course materials, but concerned about copyright or felt you lack the technical skills?  Information research staff Carlie Nekrasov and Tracey Whyte have some suggestions.




The Multimedia Resources Library guide provides a gateway to subject specific and multidisciplinary video databases as well as tips for accessing, using and integrating them into your teaching.
  
The guide includes tips on how to:
  • Generate stable links for Moodle, reading lists, lecture slides
  • Save favourites into playlists 
  • Create clips for YouTube from selected databases
  • Link to or embed multimedia content
  • Understand copyright rules when using YouTube and other digital materials.
The following three resources provide a small sample of what is available through the Multimedia resources Library guide.

Resources available online

Alexander Street Press provides access to thousands of video and audio resources as well as texts across a wide range of disciplines, including film, music and performing arts, art and architecture, ethnographics, health and society, nursing and more. ASP includes contemporary as well as historical resources.

The collections available to Monash staff and students are listed under the 'My collections' link. You can also search by subject or topic, or browse by discipline. The Alexander Street Press platform offers you the flexibility to use entire videos, or to select segments or short clips.

 Photograph by Dennis Mayor 1972.
Courtesy State Library of Victoria

Detailed, step by step instructions are provided for:
  • Making a clip
  • Creating a playlist
  • Searching effectively 
  • Using the video player
  • Using the audio player 
Informit Edu TV is a TV online streaming resource that provides over 10,000 television programs to watch across a range of subject areas. You can also embed clips from the television programs into your course materials.

After setting up an individual registration to Informit EduTV you will be able to create a project file for storing your favourite shows, episodes and clips. After registering you will receive a username, and option to create a password, as well as information to help you search and create clips. You can read more about Informit EduTV in this Library blog post.

Kanopy provides a collection of around 26,000 documentaries and movies as well as selected television programs. You can for search for individual titles or browse subjects within Kanopy and individual titles are also available via Search. Further information about creating and managing clips and embedding excerpts in Kanopy can be found in this document.

Advice and tips

The Multimedia Resources Library Guide provides you with access to a world of audio, video and text resources to enhance your student’s learning experience. It provides tips on creating and maintaining a personalised set of playlists, and resources to guide you through creating clips and embedding these excerpts into your teaching materials. It even helps you find the right advice on copyright.
If you need further advice on how to best utilise these resources please contact the subject librarian in your relevant discipline or the copyright adviser.
  
The multimedia resources featured in the Multimedia Resources Library Guide are also available via Search and the Library Databases page.
  

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3 December 2015

Matheson Library to close for four weeks in early 2016

The refurbishment of the Sir Louis Matheson Library at the Clayton campus is progressing well and the first stage will be completed before Christmas. The next stage is now underway and heavy demolition will be carried out in January. 

To allow the demolition to be completed more efficiently, Matheson Library will be closed from Monday 11 January and will reopen on Monday 8 February 2016.

During this four-week closure, Monash staff and students can:
  • use Search to request items held at Matheson Library for pick up at any other library including at the Law Library and Hargrave-Andrew Library on the Clayton campus. There may be some delays as Matheson staff will only have access to the collections for short periods each day.
  • return items due at any other library or via the after-hours returns outside Matheson Library.
  • find study spaces at the two other libraries on the campus.
  • get advice and ask questions at an Information point at any other library, through ask.monash.edu, or by telephone (03 9905 5054).
Due to the closure, Search temporarily does not allow staff and students to select 'Matheson' as the pick-up location when requesting items from other libraries.

From Friday, 8 January, all Matheson holds available for collection can be picked up at the Law Library or Hargrave-Andrew Library.

Members of the public may wish to visit our other libraries on campus. Please consult the map.
  • Law Library – 15 Ancora Imparo Way
  • Hargrave-Andrew Library – 13 College Walk
We apologise for this disruption and ask for your patience through the coming months as this exciting project takes shape.

Visit the Library website for more information. If you have any comments or concerns about the Matheson Library refurbishment project, please email fsd.feedback@monash.edu.


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1 December 2015

All you need to know about reading lists and digitisation for your teaching

Reading lists created by the Library provide students with direct access to their essential recommended readings and can even be integrated with Moodle. Let the Library do the work for you!... by Adam Duke and Beth Pearson.



Who creates the reading lists?
The Library’s Readings and Reserve Services team works within the University’s seven libraries to create online reading lists using the Talis Aspire Software.

Aspire is currently used by 77 universities in seven countries worldwide.

When should I submit my reading list request to the Library?
Requests to create a reading list must be received at least four weeks before the start of the teaching period.

Submitting your requests early is important to enable your students to have access to the resources they need at the required time. Reading lists will be processed in the order in which they are received.

Minor updates and changes can be submitted any time during the year, by contacting the Readings and Reserve Services

How can students access the online reading list?
There are three simple ways:
  • Enter the unit code in Search.
  • Follow the reading lists link on the Library’s home page.
  • Visit the unit's Moodle page.
Moodle Integration
Library reading lists can now be integrated with Moodle and can be set to display from within the Moodle environment in a number of different ways. This
  • simplifies access for your students - no need to leave Moodle.
  • places the reading list resources in the most relevant section of their course unit pages.
Watch the video and contact your Faculty admin  to get started.

What are the benefits to students?
Online reading lists allow students to access all their unit readings from the one place throughout the teaching period.

Using the Aspire reading list software, students can:
  • view real time availability of the Library’s physical collection
  • gain direct access to online journal articles and databases
  • view digitised materials
  • login to add personal study notes and track their reading progress.

How does digitisation work?
The Library’s Digitisation Centre can reproduce works that are otherwise unavailable in a digital form. These digitisations are created under the provisions of Part VB of the Copyright Act (1968). The documents are stored in a central repository and made available to students via their online reading lists.

All digitisation requests are made via the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.
When a digitisation request is received by the Library it will be checked to ensure it is copyright compliant.

What are the advantages of the Library’s digitisation service over faculty photocopying?
  • University copyright compliance
  • high quality, digital reproductions with increased functionality (searchable text, commenting, and highlighting enabled)
  • easily accessible online through unit reading list
  • track usage of digitised items via the Aspire software.

How long will a reading list, and any digitised content, remain online?
Reading lists, and any associated digitised content, will remain available online throughout the unit’s teaching and exam periods.

What happens to reading lists at the end of semester?
Reading lists and any digitised items will be archived to comply with University copyright regulations.

What happens if an item can’t be digitised?
Essential readings can be placed onto restricted loan by the Library to manage student demand through the teaching period. New materials can also be purchased upon request.

Around 1,000 reading lists are created each year so we encourage you to send your request to the Library as early as possible.

For further information, contact the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.




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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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