Library

Showing posts with label students. Show all posts
Showing posts with label students. Show all posts

4 July 2017

Welcome to all new students

Hello to those who are newly enrolled. We hope you are looking forward to your time at University, despite the cold weather we are experiencing at the moment.


If you're new to Monash, we've put together the Library orientation guide to give you the basics about using the Library.  You will also find Library activities in the Orientation planner.

But first, some interesting facts: did you know that research shows that students who use the Library achieve better results than those who don't? [1]

At Monash 79% of students who used the Library achieved at least a Distinction, based on students' best estimates of their academic results. In the user survey, “Library use” meant either coming in to the Library or accessing it online daily or 2-4 days a week. [2]


Study spaces and facilities

New students will find that they are using smart refurbished areas with facilities like bookable discussion rooms for group projects and study, in the Caulfield and Matheson libraries. 

At Caulfield some inconvenience may apply until the building project is finalised. At present you will enter the library from the arcade level 1 between Buildings A and B (opposite Monash Connect), but very soon the main entrance facing the Caulfield Green will be open.
    
Programs, resources and activities
As well as working with you in your courses and units, we provide a range of programs and drop-in sessions related to your assignments and other tasks. Drop-ins begin from Week 2.

We’ve developed a new Research and Learning Online site as your gateway to the Library’s online learning materials. Check it out to access online modules such as academic integrity, citing and referencing, and more.

Visit the Students’ page for a complete list of Library programs, resources and activities.

Don’t forget to check this blog for useful articles with tips and advice for your study. You can also find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.


1   Soria, K. M., Fransen, J., & Nackerud, S. (2013). Library use and undergraduate student outcomes: New evidence for students’ retention and academic success.  Portal : Libraries and the Academy, 13(2), 147-164.  

2  2015 Monash University Library User survey

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6 March 2017

New online lectures for 2017

Not only are lecture recordings easier to access now, the change to Learning Capture means you can do a lot more to participate in discussions, take notes, create your personal study guide and more. It's about your learning, not just the recording.


From 2017, online lectures are available to students through Moodle. Previously, online lectures were available through the Library website.

The new Learning Capture system is a more exciting system as it lets you view a class online while it is being conducted, and allows you to participate, take notes and bookmarks, and contact your lecturer.

By visiting the Learning Capture Getting started site you can find out how to:
  • Use the Dashboard
  • View classroom lectures and answer questions during class
  • Take notes on the material and bookmark locations to return to later
  • Participate in after-class discussions and Question and Answer forums
  • Review your class Study Guide, including your notes and bookmarks.
Lectures may be broadcast live, so that you can view the lecture from elsewhere and participate as if you were in the room. If it is a live broadcast, there will be a green icon.

Later, after a class is over, you can still participate in activities like Question and Answer forums and sharing materials with other students as well as downloading the lecture, notes, and other content, and maintaining your own personal study guide.

On the “all classes” list you will see earlier lectures and materials your instructor has posted for you to read for upcoming classes.

To download a lecture you have missed: 
  • go to your unit page in Moodle
  • click on “Learning Capture” 
  • select 'all classes' for your unit
  • click the class you wish to download
  • click on the video icon and selecting 'download original'. 
Please note, you will not be able to download a lecture if your lecturer has disabled downloads for your unit. If he or she has, the Learning Capture link will be “greyed out”. If this is the case, check with your lecturer whether online lectures will be available in the future.

Please check the Learning Capture help site if you have trouble downloading your lecture or using the features of the new system.



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1 August 2016

Avoid assignment delays: get moving with effective preparation

So you’ve settled into the start of semester and have discovered all the assignment tasks you’ll need to complete in the next couple of months. Sometimes it can feel like you just don’t know where to start, or need to keep reading before you can start writing, or maybe you just start writing straight away on whatever you can think of. Don’t fall into these traps - good assignment writing needs good preparation. Here are some tips to get you pumping out your assignments effectively from Learning Skills Adviser, Emma Price.



  1. notes-514998_1920.jpgAnalyse your task

The first step in any assignment is to make sure you clearly understand what it is asking you to do. You may think you’ve got the idea from a quick read over, but you could miss out on some important details or misunderstand the question if you don’t spend a bit of time on task analysis. Comprehensively covering what is asked will usually add more marks onto your grade. Here’s some pointers to get you started: 

  • Think about whether or not you understand all of the terms involved - what might you need to look up?
  • You should highlight or scribble on the task itself for words or phrases that give you direction (what you need to do), content (topic or context) and limits (to set the required scope).

As you complete your assignment, you should always return to the task to make sure you are answering the topic and sticking to what was asked.

  1. Brainstorm and plan

Now that you understand what you need to do, a good next step is to spend a bit of time brainstorming. You might like to try creating a mindmap or just jotting down your thoughts on a page to record your ideas as you go.

  • What do you already know about this topic? What knowledge gaps will you need research?
  • How does this task fit into what you’ve covered in class?
  • What is your initial position towards the task? How will you approach what it is asking you to do?

This brainstorm is a great way to develop a plan. With your task analysis and initial thoughts on the topic, you can plot out how you will complete the assignment. This could be a skeleton structure outline noting down what the main sections or paragraphs should cover, or just some broad headings and subheadings of the areas you want to find out more about. You may want to write your approach or argument at the top of the page to keep you on track in your plan. Remember: this plan is not set in stone and you should adapt it as you do more research and start writing - but always make sure you are answering what the task is asking you to do!

You may also want to plot out a timeline between now and the due date to keep you on track with your research and writing.

  1. Research

Using your thoughts from your brainstorm and initial plan, it should now be pretty clear where you are headed and what you need to research for your assignment. Remember: 

  • Google is not the answer.
  • You should use the enormous amount of materials available to you through the Library. This way you get informed, credible and useful resources to help you in your assignment.
  • Try your faculty Library guide for some starting points on databases or key resources.
  • Your textbook or unit readings might help give you some background knowledge or starting points to expand your research.

From this, you can add in more ideas to your plan and get a better picture of how you will write your assignment. Keep on track by knowing your focus in the assignment and sticking to relevant reading - don’t get too lost in unhelpful tangents that will just use up precious time!

Remember to note down all the details for any sources you use for your referencing. And don’t get caught thinking you have to read more before you can start writing - you can always research as you write if you find there are some gaps to fill or you don’t have a good example for a particular part of your assignment.

By following these steps to get you started, you should have a really strong sense of your assignment. Use your expanded plan to avoid any writing procrastination - you know what you want to say and have the research notes to help you say it! Some students find sitting in front a blank screen and starting with their introduction makes their brain go blank. If this is the case for you, why not try starting at the next paragraph to get you going. You can always return after you have got your main argument paragraphs on the page, and this might help you write a clear and relevant introduction in the end anyway!

Don’t forget the friendly Librarians and Learning Skills Advisers at the Research and Learning Point! Drop-ins are available if you have any questions on how to get started on your assignment writing or research.

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9 May 2016

How to put the fun back into uni (essays, exams and all)


As you approach the end of semester you may find that most of your work is due at the same time. Yikes! Not only that - you have exams approaching fast. This can be stressful, especially if this is your first time, or if you haven’t done so well in past semesters. It is always worth remembering that you’re not alone. Form a study group and try these approaches to make studying more fun! ...by Damian Gleeson and Romany Manuell.


Form a study group

Study at uni can be a lonely business. Why not reach out to some people in your tutorial and form a study group? Ideally, a study group consists of 4 or 5 members… any more than that, and you’re looking at a party!

The DISC questionnaire can be a useful tool for determining your group members’ personalities and approaches to work. This can help you to identify the variety of strengths and areas that need work among your team mates. Once you’ve worked all this out, you may find something like this:
  • Student A is quiet, but takes meticulous lecture notes. Student A is a useful resource for the group for this reason. He’s a top record-keeper of key lecture content.
  • Student B is talkative and energetic. She is great at remembering conversations and important insights from your tutor. She’s both likeable and a natural leader. Combined with Student A’s lecture notes, you have the lecture and tute materials covered.
  • Student C’s strength is research and reading. They got a HD for the first assignment and your tutor singled out their excellent research, citing and referencing skills. Someone with this much attention to detail is a great resource to ensure that your group is at its most effective when revising the semester’s content.
  • Student D is also quiet and is not confident about her English language skills. However, she has work experience in the field you are studying, which allows her to clearly see and explain why the unit’s content is relevant to your group’s future professions.
So there is a wide range of personalities, skills and knowledge in your group. Cool! This means any areas that individual members think are weaknesses for them can be overcome by the members who are strong in those areas. Your strengths are not just an advantage for you - your team mates can also reap the benefits. Put your skills to use reviewing the reading, lecture and tutorial materials. Put your group to the test by working on past exam questions together.

Revision - turn a boring chore into clever fun

If this describes you and the way you like to work (left), take advantage of it (right). Why not take advantage of the way you like to work?

I like setting and meeting goals
Use a to-do list
I work best against the clock
I like to draw or doodle
Use mind maps to outline how to solve a problem
I like music
Write songs about important information that you need to remember. More here.
I’m a night owl. I enjoy staying up late
Study when you are most alert and do mundane tasks when you are least alert
Solve questions from the textbook
A no brainer
If there are few questions, turn chapter titles into questions then practise answering them.
For example:

Chapter titles
        Managing in a global environment
        Social responsibility and managerial ethics
        Managing change and innovation
        Motivating employees
(Robbins, Bergman, Stagg, & Coulter, 2012)
Requires a brain




Questions
        What issues arise for managers in a global environment?
        What is social responsibility and how do managerial ethics apply to it?
        How are change & innovation best managed?
        Why & how do managers motivate employees?





























If you remain uncertain about how to be efficient and take joy in your academic work, don’t forget a friendly Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser is available to speak with you at a drop in.



Damian Gleeson is a learning skills adviser and Romany Manuell is a subject librarian at Caulfield Library.

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29 February 2016

Time management: Getting things done!

Some things remain a challenge no matter how organised you are. If you want to be prepared for your university course this year, read a few tips from Library staff  Damian Gleeson and Michelle De Aizpurua.


University requires a lot more independence in your studies than when you were at school. This means you are responsible for organising your own schedule and study plans. You are free to take the approach that best suits you, however leaving everything to the last minute usually isn’t the best strategy. This post offers some advice and suggestions on how to manage your time so you can be a successful student and have a life!

Watch this short video to see tips, advice and suggested strategies for organising your time and your life. The better you can do this, the more successful you are likely to be.



Procrastination affects everyone - ever heard of the procrastibaking method? But you can prevail. One of the best ways you can avoid the need to pull all-nighters, panicking and madly typing with only coffee and Red Bull to keep you company, is to keep organised with a long-term semester plan and a short-term weekly plan.

Whether you like to write important dates in your diary or use a Google calendar, get organised now! You’ll be grateful for it when the pressure is on.

We’ve got some great resources available on our Research & Learning Online site, covering things like managing your time, and setting up your personal study space. You can also check out these helpful study strategies, grab a few pointers on the transition from research to writing, and other time-saving tips.

Don’t forget, we have workshops for this stuff too! Log in to the Library Class Booking System and search for ‘time’ or ‘study skills’ to see what's on offer from our expert staff.

Starting your assignments ahead of time means you’ll have more wiggle room when your new uni friends invite you out for fun times - and the only regret you’ll have the next day is that one extra drink, not that one extra essay.



Damian Gleeson is a Research and Learning Coordinator at Caulfield Library and Michelle Aizpurua is a librarian at the Law Library.


Graphic: Nessima El Qorchi


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24 February 2016

Welcome to all students

Hello to those who are newly enrolled and welcome back to our continuing students. We hope you all had a wonderful summer break.


If you're new to Monash, we've put together the Library orientation guide to give you the basics about using the Library.

If you're returning this semester, we'd like to update you on what's up at the Library.

But first, some interesting facts: did you know that research* shows that students who use the library achieve better results than those who don't?

At Monash 79% of students who used the Library achieved at least a Distinction, based on students' best estimates of their academic results. In the user survey, Library use meant either coming in to the library or accessing it online daily or 2-4 days a week.

Study spaces and facilities
  • The refurbishments are the big news at the moment and mean that the opening hours of some libraries are a little different this year. It's worth noting that Matheson and Hargrave-Andrew Libraries have swapped hours. The latter is now open until 12 midnight Monday to Thursday, and until 9pm on Friday. Matheson Library will be open until 9pm Monday to Friday. TIP: Library hours are on the Monash app.
  • At Matheson Library you can already use the refurbished North part of the building. This houses the new bookable discussion rooms for group projects and study, and two new large teaching rooms, which you can use for study when it's not booked for classes. You'll find the Research and Learning point has also relocated to this part of the library. The refurbishment in other parts of the Matheson Library will continue this year.
  • Extra seating has been provided on level 5 at Matheson, and at both Hargrave-Andrew Library and Law Library.
  • At Caulfield Library, the staircase next to the library has been demolished. To access the library, come up to the level 2 entry using the staircase outside Building K, come across from Building B (use lift for accessibility), or use the overpass or the eastern staircase of Building A. 
  • Inside Caulfield Library, study facilities are available and regular services continue although some areas have been closed off.  Additional study seats are available in C1 (see campus map).
Programs, resources and activities
  • As well as working with you in your courses and units, we provide a range of programs and drop-in sessions related to your assignments and other tasks. Drop-ins begin from Week 2. 
  • We’ve developed a new Research and Learning Online site as your gateway to the Library’s online learning materials. Check it out to access online modules such as Academic integrity, Citing and referencing, and more.
Visit the Students’ page for a complete list of Library programs, resources and activities.

Don’t forget to check this blog for useful articles with tips and advice for your study. You can also find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.



Soria, K. M., Fransen, J., & Nackerud, S. (2013). Library use and undergraduate student outcomes: New evidence for students’ retention and academic success.  Portal : Libraries and the Academy, 13(2), 147-164.



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5 October 2015

Library refurbishments update


Architect's design for new entry, Caulfield Library
While the refurbishment of the Caulfield and Matheson libraries may cause some inconvenience, in the long run the transformation of these libraries will contribute to improved student facilities at the University. We apologise for any current inconvenience.

At Caulfield Library the work is expected to start on Thursday 15 October. The builders will be working on level four and on two sides of level three. This will affect study facilities and collections:

Level four will be a construction zone. The postgraduate rooms, the meeting room and the quiet study area on that level are no longer available. Study desks and chairs have also been moved down to other floors for students to use.
  • On level three, 24 computers have been moved from the west side of the library to the east side, so that students can still use them.
  • Books, journals and audio-visual collections are being moved down to the ground level. If you can’t find an item, ask at the information point for its new location.
  • The library lift is closed except to users with a disability.
At the Matheson Library, Clayton Campus, building work is well underway in the north end of the library. Ask at the information point to request material from the Matheson Store and the Asian Studies Research Collection. Toilets on the lower ground floor are temporarily unavailable during this stage of the building works.

Alternative toilet facilities are available on the upper floors of the library, opposite the Den Café in the underpass, and in nearby buildings including the Rotunda and the Menzies Building. After 5pm students may use toilet facilities on level one of the Information Services Building.
If you require any assistance please ask at the information point.

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17 April 2015

Using the Library’s extensive Teaching Materials Collection

Ever wondered what to use and how to get the most out of your teaching placements?  Needing to structure your lessons in a particular way? The Library has a collection of teaching resources just for this purpose...by Carlie Nekrasov


Large abacus from the Teaching Materials Collection
The Teaching Materials Collection is varied and can be used in any teaching setting, including early childhood, primary and secondary teaching rounds. It includes board books, musical instruments, DVDs, big books (over 40cm in height or width), junior and young adult fiction books and educational kits and toys.

How to locate teaching materials in Search

Teaching materials are called ‘curriculum materials’ in the Library’s online Search interface. For instance, to find ‘educational toys’ you simply type the words into the search box. You then need to apply the facets on the left hand side to narrow down your search to ‘curriculum materials’ (found under the ‘Special collection’ heading).

To physically locate your item, click on ‘Get it’ as this will show which library holds the item. You can even request an item if it is only held at another campus.

Which campuses have a Teaching Materials Collection?

The Teaching Materials Collection is found at three of our libraries - Berwick, Matheson and Peninsula. Peninsula’s collection is located on level 2 of the Library. Matheson currently has their collection located on the first floor. Berwick’s collection can be found off to the right of the information desk just before the general collection begins.

Do you have to be an Education student to access the materials?

Certainly not. The collection can be accessed by staff and students for personal use also. For example the collection contains a huge range of award-winning Australian picture books for children that can be borrowed for reading at home.


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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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