Library

Showing posts with label research. Show all posts
Showing posts with label research. Show all posts

15 August 2017

Attention postgrads! Your guide to specialised Library expertise

Postgraduate study is exciting, but challenging too - it requires you to step up your skills to reap the rewards. Librarian Romney Adams assures us that specialist library expertise is available.


If you’ve studied at Monash as an undergrad, you may be aware of some of what the Library has to offer. But did you know we have a whole variety of expertise and resources available just for postgrads? 

Firstly, don’t worry if you’re undertaking your studies by coursework, or research - all of the resources I’ll mention are available to all of our postgrads.

Although you may be studying by coursework, you’ll usually have some kind of research component to your degree - and while the Library has access to literally millions of items for you to use, sometimes we just don’t have that one paper that could inform your research. If that’s the case, never fear - our Document Delivery team is ready to go! Staff in this area will investigate getting the material you require from another institution - either within Australia, or overseas. This small group is the friend of many a researcher - simply fill out the document delivery form, and they’ll handle the rest!

You may know about our Research & Learning Point, where you can chat to a Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser for 10-15 minutes to get insight into the research and structure of your work. For postgrads, this offer goes a little further. If you’d like to have a more in-depth chat about your work, email your Subject Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser and ask for a consultation. These usually last between 30-60 minutes, and will give you the chance to discuss your work with a professional who has expertise in your area. They’ll be able to work with you to determine a good search strategy, some useful databases for you to use, and can usually offer a different approach to your research that you may not have considered. Or perhaps it’s your written communication you wish to fine-tune? We can also talk to you about refining your argumentation, structuring your work, and improving your synthesis of information. Not sure who your Subject Librarian or Learning Skills Adviser is? You can find a list of contacts on the Library website, or ask at your Library’s Information Point.

If your degree is research-focused, have a look at the Graduate Research Library Guide, which gives you a fantastic overview of and introduction to the work you’ll need to undertake over the course of your degree. This includes information about conducting your literature review, communicating your research, and managing your research data. Keep an eye out in myDevelopment for Library-run Graduate Education Workshops to register for as well. We really are here to work with you every step of the way!

We have some faculty- or discipline-specific resources available too, most notably the Systematic Review Library Guide. Systematic reviews are complex, and therefore a little daunting, but this Guide has been developed by staff from the Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences (MNHS) team, and contain a wealth of information to take you through the steps. Not in MNHS? Ask your Librarian if there are any specific postgrad resources available for your faculty.

Enjoy your time as a postgraduate at Monash - and make full use of the Library’s specialised expertise while you’re with us.

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2 August 2017

Annotations and illustrations delight collectors

Inscriptions in children's books of the past can be of interest to both scholars and collectors, writes librarian Mia Goodwin.

Sometimes books inscribed by ordinary people can be valuable if the inscription gives insight into the context of the book’s history, production, reception or use.

Take, for example, Monash University Library Rare Books Collection’s copy of Tippoo: A tale of a tiger, by C. W. Cole (1905). This otherwise ordinary children’s book has become extraordinary due to the intriguing annotations inscribed by a previous owner. Mary M. Daubeney gifted the book to Peggy Morton, and carefully annotated each picture with quotations from some of Thomas Moore’s Irish melodies, often to comedic effect. See example above.

This demonstrates historical use of the book itself; how the owner engaged with it, adding textual layers and changing the book to become more playful and distinct for a gift.

Often, an ordinary book becomes especially unique, and therefore ‘rare’, if it was owned by someone famous, particularly if they inscribed their name or wrote a note in the book itself. For example, the Rare Books Collection is fortunate to hold a deluxe second edition of  Stories from Hans Andersen (1912), which includes a touching inscription by Nobel prize-winning author, Sinclair Lewis (1885 – 1951), who gave the book to his parents for Christmas in 1914, as shown below.


Sinclair Lewis was an American author famous for his wit and critique of the American literary establishment. That Lewis gave Andersen’s fairy tales to his parents demonstrates an appreciation of the Danish children’s author, and thus by examining the book in its context, scholarly conclusions may be drawn about Lewis’ literary upbringing and interests that could perhaps inform discussions around Lewis’ work. This is a benefit of examining rare books in context, and demonstrates one way that students and researchers can engage with the Rare Books Collection.

Deluxe books, especially for children, were often given as Christmas gifts in the early twentieth century. This stately edition is a collection of some of Andersen’s most loved stories, including ‘The Snow Queen’ and ‘The Mermaid’. The book is bound in pictorial cloth with beautiful inlaid gilt, as shown at right:

The book includes illustrations by French artist, Edmund Dulac (1882 – 1953). Dulac’s illustrations were exhibited by Leicester Galleries, and published by Hodder & Stoughton. The illustrations are of exceptional quality and were tipped-in separately. Dulac was a leading artist in the Golden Age of Illustration, alongside others such as Arthur Rackham, W. Heath Robinson, and Kay Nielsen. These artists largely provided illustrations for children’s books, and typically experimented with colour and rendering techniques. Their efforts were very well received:

Dulac's art, however, is not of the kind that only the critic may enjoy, for it is rich with poetry and imagination, and strong in the possession of that decorative element which renders a picture universally pleasing” (Stuart, 1910)

 For lovely examples of Dulac’s work see the Snow Queen and other characters below:






To view these books and other rare items, or for research advice and discussion contact Rare Books, or come and visit us at the new Special Collections Reading Room at Matheson Library.


Andersen, Hans Christian. Stories from Hans Andersen. Illustrated by Edmund Dulac, 2nd ed., Hodder & Stoughton, 1912.

Cole, C. W., and William Ralston. Tippoo : A Tale of a Tiger. New Ed., Simpkin Marshall / Hamilton Kent & Co, 1905.

Stuart, Evelyn Marie. “Edmund Dulac—A Poet of the Brush.” Fine Arts Journal, vol. 23, no. 2, 1910, pp. 87–102. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/23905910.

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27 July 2017

Factiva news database, and Fairfax newspapers digital editions

Find out what is happening in Australia and internationally with Factiva and/or Fairfax Media writes David Horne, Subject Librarian for Business and Economics.


Factiva is is a database of over 30,000 international news sources, encompassing print, electronic media transcripts and free Web-based publications. Content is added daily. It is an invaluable tool for keeping up to date with current and business affairs in a particular part of the world, for investigating past events, or for studying the way news is reported.

Australian coverage includes not only the major city and national papers, such as The Australian and The Australian Financial Review, but regional and local newspapers.

Search results can be readily sorted by date, or filtered according to a range of criteria, including source, article author, company, industry, and region. The articles from print publications do not include images.

While the key content is news, Factiva also provides brief company and industry profiles and global financial market data.

Complementing Factiva, the Library can now provide daily access to the full digital versions of the Fairfax newspapers: The Age, The Australian Financial Review and The Sydney Morning Herald.  
Click the links below to access each Search record, click "View It" , then "Fairfax Newspapers".














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17 July 2017

Kashgar: a digital exhibition


John Gollings, 2005 Kashgar Old City
New technology has enhanced an evocative exhibition at Matheson Library.


Arts, the Library, and an IT student have come together to present a digital exhibition of original photographs, enhanced with new technology, to welcome the viewer into a remote part of China.

Kashgar is an exhibition of evocative photos by Australian photographer John Gollings, collected as part of a Monash Asia Institute international research project to document, measure, and define the most significant cultural monuments and spaces of Kashgar in Western China.

Gollings’ photographs lead the audience on a personal journey through China’s largest oasis city, nestled between sun-scorched deserts and towering mountain peaks, where the long-distance trade routes of numerous old Silk Roads once converged. A constant feed of tradeable goods, merging cultures and varying religions kept the thriving markets of Kashgar alive for thousands of years, now for you to experience through a selection of photographs from the Library’s John Gollings’ Kashgar collection.

Visitors to the Library can continue their exploration of this ancient city on their mobile devices by accessing an interactive tour of the region, thanks to content created by Information Technology student Vinu Alwis. Access the interactive experience by scanning this code with the free Zappar app. Here you can access additional photos, insightful videos, and descriptions of Kashgar city and surrounding towns.

David Groenewegen, the Library’s Director, Research, said that the Library was delighted to have the opportunity to work with a student to help expand access to the amazing materials collected by this project. Innovative digital techniques and apps have the potential to help libraries and other cultural institutions grow awareness of their collections.

The exhibition will be on display at the Sir Louis Matheson Library, Clayton until December this year.

Get a taste of the exhibition with this video of project director Marika Vicziany and John Gollings recounting their experiences of Kashgar.


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6 July 2017

Contribution to Jewish studies recognised

Items from the Laura and Israel Kipen Judaica Collection 
Monash University Library respectfully notes the recent passing of Mr Israel Kipen. Mr Kipen was former Chair of the Joint Committee for Tertiary Jewish Studies, a group that was instrumental in establishing the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation at Monash University and the Arnold Bloch Lectureship in Jewish History at the University of Melbourne.

The Library acknowledges the generous benefaction from Mr and Mrs Kipen, materials known as the Laura and Israel Kipen Judaica Collection and officially launched by the Library on 23 October 1995. These works are located on level 1 of the Sir Louis Matheson Library, Monash University, Clayton. Students and staff and members of the public interested in viewing material from the Laura and Israel Kipen Judaica Collection can use Search to discover, locate and borrow items. For assistance with this please contact Louise Micallef, Subject Librarian for Jewish Studies at louise.micallef@monash.edu

The Library also holds a unique collection of approximately 200 Australian testimonials from Jewish survivors of the Holocaust. These are kept in our Special Collections area on the ground floor of the Sir Louis Matheson Library, Monash University. Clayton. Students, staff and members of the public interested in viewing these items are welcome to contact specialcollections@monash.edu. prior to visiting the Library. The specialist nature of these materials requires them to be read only within the Special Collections Reading Room at the Matheson Library.

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13 June 2017

Punk zines and fanzines find a new home at Monash


The world of "Punk" is making inroads into the Rare Books Collection at Monash, says librarian Daniel Wee.


Monash University Library recently acquired a small collection of important punk zines, fanzines, and magazines to add to the Rare Books Collection.

The inception of the ‘punk zine’ in the mid to late 1970’s saw it explode into the post-punk period of the 1980’s which included the new-wave and hardcore scenes. Their purpose was to provide a platform for fans to communicate with one another and circulate ideas — think of it as blogging. Research potential with these materials lies in the exploration of the non-elite and their resistance to conformity, as well as providing valuable insight into underground and D.I.Y. publishing.

The collection includes numbers 1, 2 and 11 of Punk magazine; arguably the earliest example of the genre.

Punk,  Numbers 1, 2 and 11




Founded by Legs McNeil and John Holmstrom, these were highly influential magazines designed to promote bands, commentary, and the punk rock movement. As a rather well known artist, Holmstrom illustrated several well known Ramones albums. Our bookseller has advised us that number 2 was originally in the possession of Holmstrom, however, there is no evidence of provenance in our copy. Punk magazine popularised The Ramones, The Stooges, the New York Dolls, and was influential in the CBGB NY club phenomenon.

1st Annual Punk magazine awards ceremony
This fantastic original copy of the “1st annual Punk Magazine Awards Ceremony” (below) brought huge media attention due to the recent split of the Sex Pistols and the arrest of Sid Vicious under suspicion of murder. The awards night ensued into a drunken rowdy mess, which saw Lou Reed refusing to take the stage and accept his award for Class Clown.

Nart, Number 1
Best known for contributor Jello Biafra of the Dead Kennedys, Nart originated from an artist's collective that focused on punk and new wave in the Berkeley area.

Zone V and Killer magazine are important social document for the evolution of the punk movement as it transitioned into the 1980’s hardcore scene. Sonic Youth founder, Thurston Moore was a major contributor. It also includes an early Sonic Youth poster.


Zone V, Killer and poster of Sonic Youth in Killer

The final issue of Sluggo is referred to as the 'Industrial Collapse' issue, and signifies the transition from punk fanzines to aestheticism. 

Sluggo

The game of industrial collapse


If you would like to view any of the items referred to in this post, please do not hesitate contact us at rbinfo@monash.edu.


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