Library

Showing posts with label reading list. Show all posts
Showing posts with label reading list. Show all posts

1 December 2015

All you need to know about reading lists and digitisation for your teaching

Reading lists created by the Library provide students with direct access to their essential recommended readings and can even be integrated with Moodle. Let the Library do the work for you!... by Adam Duke and Beth Pearson.



Who creates the reading lists?
The Library’s Readings and Reserve Services team works within the University’s seven libraries to create online reading lists using the Talis Aspire Software.

Aspire is currently used by 77 universities in seven countries worldwide.

When should I submit my reading list request to the Library?
Requests to create a reading list must be received at least four weeks before the start of the teaching period.

Submitting your requests early is important to enable your students to have access to the resources they need at the required time. Reading lists will be processed in the order in which they are received.

Minor updates and changes can be submitted any time during the year, by contacting the Readings and Reserve Services

How can students access the online reading list?
There are three simple ways:
  • Enter the unit code in Search.
  • Follow the reading lists link on the Library’s home page.
  • Visit the unit's Moodle page.
Moodle Integration
Library reading lists can now be integrated with Moodle and can be set to display from within the Moodle environment in a number of different ways. This
  • simplifies access for your students - no need to leave Moodle.
  • places the reading list resources in the most relevant section of their course unit pages.
Watch the video and contact your Faculty admin  to get started.

What are the benefits to students?
Online reading lists allow students to access all their unit readings from the one place throughout the teaching period.

Using the Aspire reading list software, students can:
  • view real time availability of the Library’s physical collection
  • gain direct access to online journal articles and databases
  • view digitised materials
  • login to add personal study notes and track their reading progress.

How does digitisation work?
The Library’s Digitisation Centre can reproduce works that are otherwise unavailable in a digital form. These digitisations are created under the provisions of Part VB of the Copyright Act (1968). The documents are stored in a central repository and made available to students via their online reading lists.

All digitisation requests are made via the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.
When a digitisation request is received by the Library it will be checked to ensure it is copyright compliant.

What are the advantages of the Library’s digitisation service over faculty photocopying?
  • University copyright compliance
  • high quality, digital reproductions with increased functionality (searchable text, commenting, and highlighting enabled)
  • easily accessible online through unit reading list
  • track usage of digitised items via the Aspire software.

How long will a reading list, and any digitised content, remain online?
Reading lists, and any associated digitised content, will remain available online throughout the unit’s teaching and exam periods.

What happens to reading lists at the end of semester?
Reading lists and any digitised items will be archived to comply with University copyright regulations.

What happens if an item can’t be digitised?
Essential readings can be placed onto restricted loan by the Library to manage student demand through the teaching period. New materials can also be purchased upon request.

Around 1,000 reading lists are created each year so we encourage you to send your request to the Library as early as possible.

For further information, contact the Library’s Readings and Reserve Services.




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4 August 2015

Reading Lists – your key to preparing for a lecture

Your lecturer has asked you to do a whole lot of reading before your lecture, but how do you find those articles or books? Introducing your library reading list… By Catherine Hocking


Luckily, the job of searching for these readings has already been done for you, to produce your Library reading list.

Your reading list is compiled by your lecturer and can provide a great place to start when beginning a new unit. Over the course of a unit you may be asked to refer to articles, textbooks and other materials. For most units the Library has put all these materials together for your convenience so you can get reading now!

Your Library reading list will link you to:

  • ebook versions or electronic journal articles wherever available,
  • scanned copies of articles and book chapters,
  • recommended websites, or
  • the Library catalogue record for books, allowing you to see immediately whether a copy is available.
Scanned materials are available as PDF files, allowing you to search for keywords in the text, highlight sections and add notes. Watch the video below for tips for managing your reading material.



Your lecturer may have integrated the reading list into the relevant sections of your unit’s Moodle site. If not, there are a number of other ways you can access your reading lists – from the quick links on the Library homepage, by entering your unit code into the Library’s Search or by going straight to http://readinglists.lib.monash.edu.

Once you have found the reading you need, simply click the title to see Library availability for books or a web address to link you to the full text chapter or article.

What are you waiting for? Get reading.





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About the Blog

Welcome to the Monash University Library blog. Whether you are engaged in learning, teaching or research activities, the Library and its range of programs, activities and resources will contribute to your success. Here you will find useful information, ideas, tips and inspiration. Your comments on any of the articles are welcome.

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